Third Fleet leads naval forces in the Eastern Pacific from the West Coast of North America to the international date line and is responsible for providing realistic, relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy.

Archive for August, 2012

USS Mobile Bay departs for deployment

By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO – The Ticonderoga class guided-missile cruiser, USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), is scheduled to depart Sept. 1 for an eight-month deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean and Arabian Gulf as part of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) Strike Group (JCSSG).

JCSSG is returning to the Western Pacific and U.S. Central Command areas of responsibility four months ahead of schedule after recently completing a seven-month deployment in March.

The ship is named for the Battle of Mobile Bay during the Civil War in 1864.

Third Fleet leads naval forces in the Eastern Pacific from the West Coast of North America to the international date line and is responsible for providing realistic, relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy.

For more information on Mobile Bay visit the ship’s website at:
http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/cg53
File photo:
http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=115683

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USS Sampson returns to San Diego following deployment to Western Pacific

SAN DIEGO – The guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) is scheduled to return to San Diego Aug. 31 after a six-month independent deployment to the Western Pacific and U.S. Central Command areas of responsibility (AOR).

Sampson, commanded by Cmdr. Dwayne D. Ducommun, operated with partner nations in Southeast Asia during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercises, Suez Canal escort operations, as well as assignments with the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). Sampson also took part in the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Guadalcanal celebration.

“I am very proud of the body of work and the effort of this crew for the last six months,” Ducommun said. “As with every deployment, the highlight is returning home today to happy loving friends and families and a grateful nation. We are truly fortunate and look forward to our next challenge.”

Sampson is the fourth U.S. destroyer named after Rear Admiral William Thomas Sampson, whose naval service lasted from 1857 until 1902, including command of the North Atlantic Station during the Spanish-American War in 1898.

Third Fleet leads naval forces in the Eastern Pacific from the West Coast of North America to the international date line and is responsible for providing realistic, relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy.

For more information on USS Sampson (DDG102) visit: http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/ddg102
or follow them on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/USSSampson

Deployment photos:
http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=132200
http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=130338
http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=130335
http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=130278


RIMPAC 2012 Concludes

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ernesto Bonilla, RIMPAC Public Affairs

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii — The world’s largest international maritime exercise, Rim of the Pacific Exercise (RIMPAC), officially concluded Aug 3.

The 23rd exercise in the biennial RIMPAC series, this year’s version involved 22 nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, and more than 200 aircraft that operated in and around the Hawaiian Islands. The exercise is designed to foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans.

Part of that cooperation involved more than 25,000 personnel working together from Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Republic of Korea, Republic of the Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom and the United States.

“It is a testament to the power of RIMPAC that we can bring a record number of nations together and then conduct complex and purposeful training in challenging scenarios like humanitarian assistance operations,” said Adm. Cecil Haney, Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet. “The partnerships, cooperation and camaraderie forged during this exercise are essential to the promotion of peace in the Pacific region and will be invaluable during future contingencies, wherever and whenever they might be.”

RIMPAC 2012 demonstrated a variety of exercise firsts, including the first time non-U.S. officers commanded components of the combined task force during the exercise. Commodore Stuart Mayer of the Royal Australian Navy commanded the Maritime Component and Brig. Gen. Michael Hood of the Royal Canadian Air Force commanded the Air Component. Other key leaders of the multinational force included Royal Canadian Navy Rear Adm. Ron Lloyd, deputy commander of the Combined Task Force (CTF), and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force Rear Adm. Fumiyuki Kitagawa, vice commander of the CTF.

“I am truly pleased with what we have achieved as part of this exercise,” said Rear Adm. Ron Lloyd, the Deputy Combined Task Force Commander. “The challenging scenarios allowed Canadians and our Pacific Rim partners to develop the skills we will need to work successfully with each other, wherever we may be called upon to deploy,” said Lloyd.

The U.S. Navy also demonstrated its “Great Green Fleet” with surface combatants and aircraft, functioning on biofuel blends for the first time in an operation. The demonstration highlighted the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus’ energy goals to reduce the Department of Navy’s (DON’s) consumption of energy, decrease its reliance on foreign sources of oil, and significantly increase its use of alternative energy.

“If you talk to anyone who lives within the rim of the Pacific they will tell you, it’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when the next natural disaster or crisis may affect one of the countries,” said Beaman. “We (RIMPAC participants) are forming a team. In the event of the next crisis or disaster, this team will have worked with each other and understand the processes that a coalition will have to go through in order to form and be able to accomplish whatever mission we may be asked to do.”

For the first time during RIMPAC, the exercise featured a humanitarian assistance/disaster relief (HA/DR) event that facilitated training and certification for expeditionary forces to respond to foreign disasters as a Crisis Response Adaptive Force Package. Also conducted were three SINKEXS, multi-force Military Operations on Urban Terrain (MOUT) training, live-fire exercises , surface-to-air engagements, air-to-air missile engagements, surface-to-surface engagements, amphibious assaults, vessel boardings, explosive ordnance disposal, diving, salvage operations, conducted air-to-air refuelings and mine clearance operations.

“Watching this 22-nation coalition come together, each with their own individual training goals and objectives; watching the team put a plan together that accounted for each one of those training goals and objectives, and then for the last three weeks watching it all unfold; for me, that will be a lasting memory,” said Beaman.